What Are The Indications Of Heel Spur

Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Overview

It shouldn't hurt to get to your feet in the morning or walk throughout your day, but if your steps result in stabbing or aching pain in one or both heels, you may be suffering from heel spurs. Also known as calcaneal spurs or osteophytes, heel spurs are pointed, hooked or shelf-shaped calcium build-ups on the heel bone (calcaneus). While the spurs, themselves, do not sense pain, their tendency to prod the soft, fatty tissues of the heel can result in severe discomfort with every step you take. This article will teach you what you need to know about heel spurs so that you can understand your symptoms and find fast relief from your pain.

Causes

Some causes of heel spurs include abnormal or lopsided walking, which places excessive stress on the heel bone, ligaments and nerves Running, jogging or jumping, especially on hard surfaces. Poorly fitted or badly worn shoes, especially those lacking appropriate arch support, excess weight and obesity.

Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Symptoms

Bone spurs may cause sudden, severe pain when putting weight on the affected foot. Individuals may try to walk on their toes or ball of the foot to avoid painful pressure on the heel spur. This compensation during walking or running can cause additional problems in the ankle, knee, hip, or back.

Diagnosis

Heel spurs and plantar fasciitis are diagnosed based on the history of pain and tenderness localized to these areas. They are specifically identified when there is point tenderness at the bottom of the heel, which makes it difficult to walk barefoot on tile or wood floors. X-ray examination of the foot is used to identify the bony prominence (spur) of the heel bone (calcaneus).

Non Surgical Treatment

Heel spurs and plantar fascitis are usually controlled with conservative treatment. Early intervention includes stretching the calf muscles while avoiding re-injuring the plantar fascia. Decreasing or changing activities, losing excess weight, and improving the proper fitting of shoes are all important measures to decrease this common source of foot pain. Modification of footwear includes shoes with a raised heel and better arch support. Shoe orthotics recommended by a healthcare professional are often very helpful in conjunction with exercises to increase strength of the foot muscles and arch. The orthotic prevents excess pronation and lengthening of the plantar fascia and continued tearing of this structure. To aid in this reduction of inflammation, applying ice for 10-15 minutes after activities and use of anti-inflammatory medication can be helpful. Physical therapy can be beneficial with the use of heat modalities, such as ultrasound that creates a deep heat and reduces inflammation. If the pain caused by inflammation is constant, keeping the foot raised above the heart and/or compressed by wrapping with an ace bandage will help. Corticosteroid injections are also frequently used to reduce pain and inflammation. Taping can help speed the healing process by protecting the fascia from reinjury, especially during stretching and walking.

Surgical Treatment

Usually, heel spurs are curable with conservative treatment. If not, heel spurs are curable with surgery, although there is the possibility of them growing back. About 10% of those who continue to see a physician for plantar fascitis have it for more than a year. If there is limited success after approximately one year of conservative treatment, patients are often advised to have surgery.

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